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Professor Toshiyuki TAKAGI and Professor Tetsuya UCHIMOTO visited PSIT on Oct.29th, 2019.

Release time:2020-01-21
Professor Toshiyuki TAKAGI and Professor Tetsuya UCHIMOTO visited PSIT on Oct.29th, 2019 and they presented wonderful talks. Prof. Ye introduced the latest research progress of PSIT to the guests.

 
Toshiyuki Takagi (Dr. Eng.) received his B.Eng., M.Eng., and D.Eng. degrees in nuclear engineering from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1977, 1979, and 1982, respectively. He was a researcher at the Energy Research Laboratory of Hitachi Ltd. from 1982 to 1987 and Associate Professor at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of the University of Tokyo from 1987 to 1989. From 1989 to 1998 he was Associate Professor, and since 1998 has been Professor, at the Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University. His current research interests include maintenance engineering, nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures using electromagnetic phenomena, and diamond and diamond-like carbon coatings and their application. He is author of more than 400 international journal papers. He is editor-in-chief of International Journal of Applied Electromagnetics and Mechanics.
 

 
Tetsuya Uchimoto received his B.Eng., M.Eng. and D.Eng. in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Tokyo, Japan in 1993, 1995 and 1998, respectively. He was a research associate at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of the University of Tokyo from 1999 to 2001. From 2001 to 2003, and from 2003 to 2017 he was Lecturer and Associate Professor, respectively, and since 2017 has been Professor, at the Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University. His research interests include evaluation of degradation of structural materials by electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation, such as austenitic stainless steels, Nickel based alloys and high Cr ferritic steels, structural health monitoring using eddy current testing and ultrasonic testing, and novel sensor development.